Saxilby and District History Group

Following the invasion of Belgium by Germany, Britain declared war on 4th August 1914. This was not an unexpected event, as there had been much 'sabre rattling' during the previous years.

Turkey had been involved in war over the Balkans against Bulgaria, Albania and Serbia.

The King of Greece was assassinated in 1913, and on 1st January 1914, Lloyd George called the build-up of arms in Western Europe 'organised insanity'.

In March, the Russian government announced an increase in the standing army from 460,000 to 1,700,000.

The trigger for war was the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and his wife in Sarajevo on 28th June 1914.


Several Saxilby men were already in the forces at the outbreak of war. Driver George Walker had had four years’ service, Private E Hall nine years’ service and Gunner P Stephenson three years.

Several of the village residents were in the Navy; Petty Officer H Hill 14 years, Engine-room Artificer George Sergeant, and Able Seaman J Naylor.

Mobilisation began almost immediately; the standing forces only numbered some 710,000 men.

An aggressive advertising campaign began, including perhaps the most iconic poster of the Secretary of State for War, Lord Kitchener.

By the end of September 1914, over 750,000 men had enlisted; by January 1915, a million. The reasons for their enlistment can’t be pinned down to a single factor; enthusiasm and a war spirit certainly drove some, while for others unemployment and the prospect of a regular wage prompted enlistment. By early 1916, 2.67 million had volunteered.

Volunteers living or working in Saxilby numbered over 80.


The first to volunteer in the village was Cliff Garrod, the son of Saxilby's Stationmaster. He had been employed as a draughtsman at West's works on Sykes Lane.


With the French Army in dire need of relief, a Military Service Bill was introduced in January 1916, providing for the conscription of single men aged 18–41; in May conscription was extended to married men. By the end of the War in 1918, a further 2.77 million men had been recruited.

We are fortunate to have the memories of a few Saxilby men who went through the war.

Herbert Valley was a market gardener in Saxilby, working for his father.

He came unscathed through three years of war. A survivor from the battles of the Somme and Passchendaele, he was a sniper in the Royal Artillery.

In later life, Herbert wrote a poem entitled 'The Poacher's Story'. Here is an extract -

    Then came the nineteen-fourteen war,

When to Lincoln Barracks I went.

And after a few weeks training,

Over to France I was sent.

  They made me the Company Sniper,

I was always good with a gun.

So instead of knocking off pheasants,

I was taking pot shots at the Hun.

  But often at night in the trenches

Where the smell of cordite clings,

I would look for the call of a pheasant,

And the whir of partridge wings.


Herbert was a member of the Royal Observer Corps during World War II and died in 1977.

The three sons of Village Postmaster Henry Read, Arthur (age 19), Harold (17) and William (16), had all volunteered by mid-1915.

In the years following the war, William Read wrote a comprehensive record of his time throughout the conflict.

'It wasn't all patriotism that decided me to join the Army on January 1st, 1915 - the war wouldn't last long, and a bit of camp life would be a nice change, but the one thing to be avoided was carrying a pack, so it must be a mounted unit.

The Recruiting Officer said, "There's a test this morning, report to the sergeant behind a pub”. And the test was round Retford Market Square!

My first Army order was "Halt! Get off before you fall off". So, I became a driver.

William's brother Arthur had joined the Royal Flying Corps, obtaining the rank of Flight Lieutenant. During World War II he served in the RAF as a Wing Commander.

Harold Read was killed during the Battle of the Somme on 24th July 1916.

This is considered to be one of humanities bloodiest battles, where over one million men were wounded or killed.

His brother William writes -

'Actually firing the gun as no.3 gave me the greatest thrill, but it wasn't just that - having just heard that my brother Harold ('Scrim' as he was known by his nick name) had been killed on the Somme, my mental reaction was definitely Revenge, and many a time I pulled the firing lever, perhaps I even said "that's for Scrim, BANG, share that you b......".

The thought that I would never see dear old Scrim again was almost unbearable; he was only out in France a couple of months.'


Armistice between the Allies and Germany came into effect at 11am on 11th November 1918.

One of the bloodiest wars in the history of humankind had claimed the lives of nearly 10 million, with a further 8 million posted missing. Over fifty men were lost from Saxilby and district.

WAR MEMORIALS

All memorials from the beginning of time to the present, except for the Cenotaph in London, have been erected by the local community as opposed to the Government.

The collation of names for inclusion had an element of hard graft, and was done in any number of ways, for example -

 Door to door enquiries

Leaflet through the letter box

Announcement in church

An article in the local magazine or

Word of mouth.

It is not uncommon for a name to be missing from a memorial. Some families held onto the hope that their loved ones would return.

There are some individuals commemorated despite the fact they don't come from the area.

On our memorials for example, the Saxilby fiancée of one individual who lived in Lincoln asked that he be included.

In Saxilby, a committee, formed in 1916, consdered suggestions for honouring the fallen, and eventually presented a scheme at a public meeting on 19th February 1920 to purchase 7.3 acres of land from Mrs Broughton and others for a recreation ground. £950 was collected through public subscription.

The land was laid out, and an existing building converted to a pavilion. A marble tablet listing the names of the fallen (now in the Village Hall) was fixed to an internal wall.

On 20th April 1921, a procession, headed by Mr J R Jackson, the committee chairman, clergy and invited guests marched from the Ship Inn to the entrance gate where Arthur Middleton gave a resume of the project.

Presented with a golden key, Major John Molson, MP for Gainsborough ceremonially unlocked the gate. The party proceed to the pavilion, where a service was conducted by Revd Geoffrey Hillyard.

There is also a memorial tablet in St Botolph’s church.

A memorial dedicated to their lost school chums was erected in the School (now located in St Andrew's Centre) which contains additional names.

Members of the Methodist Church erected a memorial to those members of their congregation who were killed during the conflict.

Wrought iron gates and pillars bearing inscriptions for both World Wars were unveiled at the entrance to the War Memorial Playing Field on William Street on 11th January 1948.

The names of 33 men were inscribed on the original tablet. There are an additional 8 names inscribed on the School Memorial Board. A further 18 men have been found with Saxilby and District connections.


The standing memorial at the entrance to the playing was renovated in 2018 by the Parish Council and members of Saxilby Mystery Group, who raised funds by holding two Murder Mystery Evenings and a Ghost Walk. A memorial bench was installed overlooking the memorial.













~SAXILBY AND DISTRICT ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-1918~


PRIVATE GORDON RAVENSCROFT

6th BATTALION LINCOLNSHIRE REGIMENT


Joined the Army in 1914.


DIED EARLY 1915 AT GRANTHAM CAMP




PRIVATE HARRY REED

ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY


The son of Thomas and Cathrine Reed of Broxholme, he was a professional soldier, joining before 1901.


DIED OF DISEASE 27 MARCH 1915 AGED 35




LANCE CORPORAL HARRY INGALL

2nd BATTALION LINCOLNSHIRE REGIMENT - FORMERLY MANCHESTER REGIMENT

Formerly from Fiskerton, he volunteered for service in Saxilby in November 1914.


DIED ON 9 MAY 1915 AGED 22



PRIVATE EDGAR HALL

2nd BATTALION LINCOLNSHIRE REGIMENT


A resident of Saxilby, he had 9 years-service before the war. He had been previously badly wounded before being drafted out to France again.

DIED 9 MAY 1915 AGED 26



PRIVATE FRANK EDWARD ANCLIFF

6th BATTALION LINCOLNSHIRE REGIMENT


His family home was Trinity House, Saxilby. He was a farm worker.

DIED ON 9 AUGUST 1915 AGED 19





PRIVATE FRANK MILNER

6th BATTALION LINCOLNSHIRE REGIMENT


Joined up in October 1914. He was a farm worker who lived with his parents Tom and Minnie Milner.


DIED 9 AUGUST 1915 AGED 20



PRIVATE FRANCIS EDWARD BARLOW

6th BATTALION LINCOLNSHIRE REGIMENT


Born in Lincoln. Remembered on the school memorial.


DIED 22 AUGUST 1915 AGED 19




PRIVATE ALEC BLADES

6th BATTALION LINCOLNSHIRE REGIMENT


Lived at Ingleby with his parents Arnold and Annie. He was a blacksmith with Mr Harrison on the High Street.


DIED 29 AUGUST 1915 AGED 24


PRIVATE ROBERT SIMS

CANADIAN INFANTRY

His branch of the family emigrated to Canada in the 1860’s. Other family members were still living and working in Saxilby as farmers.


DIED 8 OCTOBER 1915, AGED 21, IN LINCOLN MILITARY HOSPITAL


CHARLES STANYON possibly L/CPL CHARLES NEAL STANYON

1st BATTALION LINCOLNSHIRE REGIMENT


His Parents lived at Leasingham Moor, Sleaford. Remembered on the school memorial.


DIED 13 OCTOBER 1915 AGED 26


PRIVATE JOHN WILLIAM VASEY

1st BATTALION LINCOLNSHIRE REGIMENT


Son of John and Elizabeth Vasey. His father was a farm foreman in Saxilby.


DIED 13 OCTOBER 1915 AGED 29



ACTING CPL RICHARD PERCY SWALLOW – known as PERCY

4th BATTALION LINCOLNSHIRE REGIMENT


He was a thrasher draughtsman, son of Richard and Emily from Lincoln.


DIED 13 OCTOBER 1915 AGED 28


SAPPER ISAAC KIRTON

72nd FIELD COMPANY ROYAL ENGINEERS


Originally from Bransby, he volunteered for service in 1914.


DIED OF DYSENTARY IN A MALTESE HOSPITAL ON CHRISTMAS DAY 1915 AGED 26


PRIVATE JOHN BRIGGS

4th BATTALION LINCOLNSHIRE REGIMENT


Husband of Millicent Briggs, Saxilby.


DIED 26 JUNE 1916 AGED 21




PRIVATE REGINALD TAGG

12th BATTALION YORK AND LANCASTER REGIMENT


Son of Caleb and Adelaide Tagg, Hardwick Farm, Saxilby. He worked on his father's farm before enlisting.


DIED 1ST JULY 1916 AGED 20



LANCE CORPORAL CHARLES COWLING

2nd BATTALION LINCOLNSHIRE REGIMENT


Born in South Carlton. Remembered on the School Memorial.


DIED 9 JULY 1916 AGED 32



SECOND LIEUTENANT ALBERT EDWARD CLARKE

6th BATTALION ROYAL WARWICKSHIRE REGIMENT


Only son of Clara Clarke, the Bungalow, Lincoln Road, Saxilby.

DIED 9 JULY 1916 AGED 23




PRIVATE HAROLD READ

LONDON TERRITORIAL FUSILIERS


The third of the postmaster's sons to enlist. Affectionately known as 'scrim' by his family, and according to them the 'brainy' one.

DIED 24 JULY 1916 AGED 19



DRIVER JOSEPH ARTHUR WELLS

ROYAL HORSE ARTILLERY AND ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY


A professional soldier, he was serving in India during 1911.


DIED IN MESOPOTAMIA (NOW IRAQ) ON 30 JULY 1916 AGED 27



RIFLEMAN RICHARD BEAL

11th BATTALION RIFLE BRIGADE


Son of Fanny Beal who lived on the High Street. Before enlisting he was a footman/valet. His effects were left to his father who was a shepherd.


DIED 18 SEPTEMBER 1916 AGED 20


PRIVATE MATTHEW ASHBY

3rd BATTALION COLDSTREAM GUARDS


Son of John and Martha Ashby, of Bransby. his father and 2 of his brothers were born in Saxilby. Before enlisting he was a farm servant at Welton Cliff.


DIED 21 SEPTEMBER 1916 AGE 22


PRIVATE WILLIAM ALLEN

9th BATTALION SHERWOOD FORESTERS (NOTTS AND DERBY REGIMENT)


Son of George and Fanny of Saxilby, husband of the late Betsy Allen.


DIED 23 SEPTEMBER 1916 AGED 35



PRIVATE ROBERT SMALLEY KENNEDY

1st / 4th Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment


The son of the late James and Sarah of Broxholme; foster-son of Jane Clay of Cherry Willingham.


Died 18 October 1916 aged 18



PRIVATE ARTHUR ROBINSON

2nd BATTALION LINCOLNSHIRE REGIMENT


Born in Toft Newton, he worked in Saxilby as a Baker.


DIED 23 OCTOBER 1916 AGED 23




PRIVATE ARTHUR LISTER

2nd BATTALION GRENADIER GUARDS


Born in Torksey. Remembered on the school memorial.



DIED 26th SEPTEMBER 1916 AGED 26




PRIVATE THOMAS POCKLINGTON

PRINCE OF WALES OWN WEST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT


Son of the Miller Arthur Pocklington, he assisted in Saxilby mill.


DIED 15 FEBRUARY 1917 AGED 26


PRIVATE RANDLE NEWCOMBE GRIFFIN

CANADIAN INFANTRY


Eldest son of the Rector of Broxholme who commissioned an altar rail in his memory.


DIED 9TH MAY 1917 AGED 30



GUNNER PERCY HENRY STEPHENSON

53rd BATTERY ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY


Joined the Army before the War in 1911 and before that worked at Wests Refrigeration Works on Sykes Lane. His father was the Saxilby Co-op Manager.


DIED 18 MAY 1917 AGED 25


PRIVATE ARTHUR BLYTHMAN

6th BATTALION LINCOLNSHIRE REGIMENT


Born at Kexby, he was a Plater's labourer in an engineering works in Gainsborough on the 1911 census. Remembered on the school memorial.


DIED 8 JUNE 1917 AGED 26


PRIVATE EDGAR POPPLEWELL WILMOT

1st/8th Battalion Prince of Wales Own Regiment


Originally from Gainsborough he left his effects to Ethel Askew, a spinster in the village.


Died 27 July 1917 aged 27



LANCE CORPORAL JOSEPH EDWARD TOYNE  

1st Battalion Coldstream Guards


Lived on Gainsborough Road and worked in Saxilby Foundry before volunteering.


Died 31 July 1917 aged 20


LIEUTENANT WILLIAM ANTHONY TAYLOR

166th Company Machine Gun Corps (Infantry)


Also commemorated at Eastgate, Lincoln, his last known address was on Nettleham Road. Remembered on the school memorial

Died 31 July 1917 aged 23



SAPPER THOMAS EDWARD THOMPSON

76th Field Company, Royal Engineers


The only son of Thomas and Fanny, who were farmers at Broadholme.


Died 6 August 1917 aged 29



SERGEANT HERBERT INGALL

2nd Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment


Originally from Timberland, he worked for Mr Spencer on Manor Farm. He enlisted at Lincoln into the 9th (reserve) Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment, transferring to the machine gun section of the 2nd Lincolns after the July 1916 Somme offensive. A year later his battalion took part in the 3rd Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele). Engaged in extremely heavy fighting during the battle of Langemarck, he was killed in action. The father of John Herbert Poole (born 1915), his partner was Edith Annie Poole of Church Lane.

Died 16 August 1917 aged 25


PRIVATE WILLIAM S BELL

1st/8th Battalion Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment)

Born at Saxilby his parents were Harriet and William. He was a horseman on a farm at Retford before enlisting. Remembered on the school memorial.


Died 13 September 1917 aged 25


PRIVATE PRESTON E SMITH  

London Regiment formerly Norfolk Regiment


He was a Bakers Assistant, born in the village


Died 2 December 1917 aged 26





SAMUEL G HILL

16th Battalion Sherwood Foresters

Born in Saxilby in 1876, the son of George and Rachael. He was a Turf Accountant in Tinsley, Sheffield in 1911. He was single.


Died 3 October 1917 aged 41



PRIVATE WILKINSON CREDLAND

10th Battalion King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry


Born in Stow but lived in Saxilby with his parents and his 7-year-old son. Widowed in 1910, he worked at the Lindsey & Kesteven Chemical Works.


Died 4 October 1917 aged 31


PRIVATE CHARLES ‘HARRY’ LAMBERT

1st/7th Battalion Sherwood Foresters


His parents lived on Sykes Lane. He is the only casualty buried in St Botolph's churchyard


Died 5 October 1917 aged 21




LANCE CORPORAL

ERNEST CUNNINGTON

1st Battalion King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment

Born in Saxilby and lived at 4 Western Avenue with his wife Lilian. He was a farm labourer.

Died 9 October 1917 aged 26




PRIVATE WILLIAM BUTLER

235th Company Machine Gun Corps (Infantry)


His parents John and Sarah lived on Lincoln Road. He was born in Saxilby and was in Billinghay Police Force before enlisting.

Died 30 November 1917 aged 24


SECOND LIEUTENANT

BASIL WALKER GRIFFIN

2nd Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment

Son of Broxholme's Rector. He is commemorated on the altar rail along with his brother. He was educated at a school for poor clergy.


Died of wounds 2nd December 1917 aged 21


ABLE SEAMAN

JOHN EDWARD CODLING

Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve


Born in Saxilby, he left a wife Nellie, who lived in Ashby-de-la-Zouche.

Died 30 December 1917 aged 30



PRIVATE WILLIAM ‘ARTHUR’ SMITH

1st Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment


Born in Saxilby in 1899. He was a local farmer's son.


Died 10 September 1918 aged 19




PRIVATE JOHN BRACKENBURY

4th Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment


Commemorated in Broxholme Church. Awarded the Military Medal and buried in Canwick Road Cemetery.


Died 5 January 1918 aged 27



PRIVATE WILLIAM STOREY

104th Company Machine Gun Corps


Son of Rebecca Storey of Gainsborough Road. Eldest of six children.

Died 15 January 1918 aged 18


PRIVATE ARTHUR WHITE

7th Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment


Spent time in a Maltese hospital with frostbitten feet. He was employed at Saxilby Foundry before enlisting.


Died 21 March 1918 aged 19



RIFLEMAN TOM GLEW

12th Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps


Awarded the military medal. He was clerk to a leather works near Skellingthorpe. The family did not originate from Saxilby but were living here when they heard he had died.

Died 2 April 1918 aged 24


PRIVATE THOMAS SCARFE

1st Battalion Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment)


Born in Chesterfield but lived and worked in the village.


Died 27 May 1918 aged 24



PRIVATE THOMAS A GLASIER

Fort Garry Horse


Son of Arthur and Mary of Saxilby. He had emigrated to Canada in his early 20's.


Died 12 August 1918 aged 29



PRIVATE CHARLES WILTON

8th Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment


Born in Doncaster he was brought up by his grandparents from a very early age. Previously a house servant.


Died 8 September 1918 aged 30



PRIVATE JOHN RAWSON

4th Battalion North Staffordshire (Prince of Wales') Regiment

Born in Laneham, his parents farmed at Ingleby. Buried in Laneham churchyard.

Died 13 May 1918 aged 40




LANCE CORPORAL ARTHUR GLEW

2nd Battalion Middlesex Regiment


Older brother of Tom Glew. Before enlisting he was a Grocer's Assistant in Hinckley.


Died 23 September 1918 aged 31


PRIVATE WILLIE CUNNINGTON

1st Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment


Enlisted in August 1914. Son of Annie who lived on Bridge Street. He was a farm labourer.


Died 29 September 1918 aged 24




PRIVATE JOHN IRA KEYWORTH

104th Battalion Machine Gun Corps


Born in Sturton-by-Stow, the son of Tom and Catherine. His father was a farm foreman in Torksey. Remembered on the school memorial.


Died 12 October 1918 aged 24


LAURENCE DRURY

2nd Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment


He was the son of Charles and Jane of Broadholme, farmers.


Died 23 October 1918 age 19



AIR MECHANIC 1ST CLASS

MOSES WILLIAM WINTERBOTTOM

Royal Air Force

Buried at Bishop Sutton churchyard, Winchester. He and his mother lived on Bridge Street when he was an apprentice at the Refrigerator Works in Saxilby. Died at Hammersmith (Fulham) Military Hospital.

Died 23 October 1918 aged 25


PRIVATE JESSE ANDREWS

144th Company, Machine Gun Corps


Commemorated in Broxholme Church. Buried in Lincoln (Newport) Cemetery.


Died 6 November 1918 aged 32




~We Will Remember Them~






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